Autumn Term – Throwing Master Class

COMING NEXT TERM

A Ceramics Master Class in Throwing

Tutored by Graham Ellerby

During the weekend Saturday 2nd / Sunday 3rd October 2010, 9.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m.

To be held at Farnham Pottery, Wrecclesham.

More information at start of next term, questions and booking, please contact Graham on 01252 850409

Rural Life Centre Tilford….need our help!

Just had a call from Sue at the Rural Life Centre in Tilford.  They are holding their ‘Rural Weekend’ on this coming Sunday 25th.  Regretfully they have just been let down by another pottery who was going to do a throwing demonstration and are wondering if we can help in their hour of need.  They are expecting about 1,500 people to attend, so good audience!

It doesn’t have to be throwing, it could be modelling.

It is short notice, but if you are available on Sunday and fancy it, it is an opportunity to sell work or take commissions.  Please let me know, so I can put you in touch with the organiser.  They will be very grateful.

Or, another thought, if there were a few that were interested, it could be a group representing WSP….bit of moral support!

Thanks

Rachel

Potters certainly know how to lunch with style!

The West Street Potters ‘Big Lunch’ was a joyous occasion for all.  A spectacular extravaganza of home-made pots, produce and culinary splendour.

An estimated 100 people turned up to share in a gourmet feast of home -grown and home-made  food.  There were home-made cooking pots galore and it was a delight to see people drinking wine and home-made elderflower cordial from mugs they had made.

The historic Farnham Pottery was fitting setting for a thriving community of potters and a wealth of creativity.

Home-made bunting added a magical touch, as did the wood-fired bread oven and the very successful pot shop selling members work.

The raku firing was a hands-on experience, with the smoke and anticipation adding to the convivial atmosphere.

Many thanks to the Big Lunch organisers for selecting us to film the event.  Our video can be seen at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhWTn0tE0Rc

Most importantly many thanks to you all for attending and making it such a success……Happy Potting!

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Raku ‘Enjoyment’

Just discovered that the Japanese work ‘Raku’ can be translated as meaning ‘enjoyment’ or ‘pleasure’, which is rather fitting.

Hope you all have your Raku pots ready for Sunday……for plenty of enjoyment….and smoke!!

Roman Pottery Session

A hands on day for a group of local Archaeologists discovering how Roman potters managed to prevent their pots cracking during firing by adding ‘tempering’ materials to the clay. Organised by Julia Quigley and Shirley Shiner, who brought marvellous photo’s of a replica Roman kiln she helped to build and fire.  Great fun was had as visitors made their own plaques from plaster moulds, carved sprigs and marvelled at the skills needed to slip trail on Roman style beakers made by Julia.

Sheena Bond inspired some to try throwing and Robert Simpson assisted all who were struggling with unfamiliar processes. A wholesome, but surprisingly delicous,  Roman cake – legionnaires could have marched from London to Hadrians wall on a slice – added the final touch to a wonderful afternoon for enthusiasts.

Museum of Farnham – Kids Smoke Firing Workshop, No 2

Another fabulous Saturday of Smoke Firing for the kids of the Museum of Farnham Saturday Club on 26th June.  Tutored by Caroline Wilson and an enthusiatic group of volunteers, it was another roaring success.

One of the children’s account of the event:

“We went to Wrecclesham Pottery with museum club.  When we got there we were given a pencil pot and a butterfly made of clay to decorate before they were going to be smoke fired.

We stuck bits of tape, rubber bands and string to our pots and butterflies  and then painted over them with clay.  We were then able to rub off bits of the clay and materials to make extra patterns.

Once this was done the pots and butterflies had to be dried out in a microwave.  Then we took them outside and set fire to them in a dustbin filled with newspaper. It was awesome, but we all got very smoky.  After a while we were able to take our precious objects out and once they were cool enough, we scraped off the sooty exterior to reveal the beautiful designs that we had made.  We were able to take them home the same day.  The best bit was setting fire to the newspaper and watching our pots bake”.

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